Where to draw the line

Last week I had the unhappy chore of taking a flight (those familiar with my opinions of the TSA will understand the phrasing).  As I once again stood in the queue to have my privacy and dignity compromised in the name of ‘security’ by a government that refuses to secure its own borders, I had to marvel at the target they’ve created.  Were I intent on doing harm to many people (which, for the record, I am not), I no longer need to get inside the ‘secure area’ of a terminal.  I only need to become part of the crowd bottled up waiting to get inside.

That, of course, is what the bombers did in Belgium last week, while I was traveling.  As Mark Steyn points out, it seems the best our officials can do in response to bombers exploiting the system we’ve created is to further expand said system… which doesn’t eliminate the vulnerable bottleneck of travelers, it merely moves it elsewhere:

Security scanners could be installed at the entrances to airports, under proposals to be discussed next week in the wake of the Brussels terrorist attack, the Telegraph understands.

The case for installing a security perimeter outside of airport arrival halls will “definitely” be examined at an emergency meeting of experts that has been called for March 31, according to EU sources.

As Steyn says, if we’re going to keep moving the perimeter, why not move it to where it belongs: our national borders?  This would mean getting serious about preventing unauthorized crossings, as well as stopping the suicidal admission of hundreds of thousands of people–and their social trappings–from the very culture that incubates the international violence whose continued increase seems to have taught our leaders absolutely nothing (except that they can actively plot to replace their constituency with a foreign polyglot more to their liking and the people will let them get away with it).

The West continues to be subjected to the largest invasion of migrants in human history — a historic development that is destroying our civilization.  We are constantly lectured about the “strengths” in diversity, but where are these to be found?  In the sectarian strife we’re importing?  In the dilution of commitment to the values that once made the West the most successful civilization on the planet?  In the toleration of barbaric practices more suited to the 11th Century than the 21st?  The science fetishists seem to overlook the fact that sociology shows diversity weakens social bonds, it doesn’t strengthen them.  Rather than stop the invasion, we have been given security theater to condition us to relinquish the hard-won rights that have been the very hallmark of our civilization. And in the meantime, our leaders continue to import more of the peoples at the heart of violence around the world, despite the expressed concerns of their own nations (whom they arrogantly dismiss as ignorant, bigoted, or some other slight).

At what point do we say “enough?”  Not just at the ballot box, but in the streets and in person?  Our current president once recommended his followers “get in their faces and punch back twice as hard.”  The ongoing loss of our very patrimony would seem a just cause for putting that advice into action.  Sure, we’ll be called ugly names.  But remember – it’s a function of projection.  The real bigoted racists are the ones in power who have decided on their own that the Western peoples and way of life have no value worth protecting.  They have forfeited their legitimacy as leaders.

It’s well past time we find some others to take their place.  Otherwise, New York, Boston, Paris and Brussels were just warm up acts to the chaos that’s to come.

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One thought on “Where to draw the line

  1. Pingback: On fakery, official and non – A True Progressive

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