A fake term

See if you can spot the fake term in this paragraph:

Infosys, the India-based information technology consulting firm with an office in Plano (Texas), is facing yet another reverse discrimination lawsuit asserting that it creates a hostile work environment for workers who are not from India or South Asia.

Let’s check the dictionary, shall we?  According to Miriam-Webster, the first use of the term “reverse discrimination” was in 1964 — right in the middle of the initial wave of efforts to subvert the United States by people who were convinced everything about it was wrong.

But why the compound term?  Simply saying that Infosys is accused of discrimination in hiring and promotion is sufficient.  The definition of “discrimination” is pretty clear:

…the act, practice, or an instance of discriminating categorically rather than individually

The term “reverse” is propaganda that suggests the victim of such action (usually white, male, Christian, or some combination of the three) is a reasonable target for such action since those groups discriminated in the past.  In fact, it seems to emphasize that “discrimination” in general is inherent only to those groups, since if it’s done by anyone else it’s just “reverse discrimination.”  Using the term subtly suggests to the reader/viewer that the instance is not as important as it would be if, say, the object of the discrimination was anyone else.  It’s a weaponization of language.

Discrimination is as old as the dispersion of mankind at Babel.  It is not an invention of Western Civilization.  People have a natural preferance to be with others who look, speak, think and live as they do.  So it makes sense that Infosys, an Indian company, would prefer Indians as employees.

This wouldn’t necessarily be a problem if the company only operated in India.  But it doesn’t.  Its operations in the United States, if the allegations are true, are just one more example of the posterity of the Founders being displaced by foreign invaders.  The tech industry is a vanguard of this process, with several high-profile instances of Americans being forced to train lower-paid foreign replacements, then laid off.  This abuse of H1-B visas by corporations, along with outsourcing jobs overseas, played a role in the buildup of resentment that led to Trump’s election.

It was a good thing that our society tried to become color-blind, and that opportunity was gradually expanded to people who had previously been left out.  Along the way, though, we started bean-counting by identity groups, which is a counterproductive way to eliminate group strife. Now it seems our elites now want to play the game of “payback’s a *****,” then act surprised when their targets fight back.  That’s why you hear the phrase “America first” more these days.  It should be expected, just as one would expect to hear “India first” if in New Delhi.

But New Delhi (and the headhunter organization Infosys) isn’t in the United States — is it?  Here, America — and Americans — have to come first.

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