Never forget September 11, 2001

Sixteen years.  That’s how long it’s been since the worst terrorist attack in American history.  A total of 2,996 people dead or never accounted for.  Symbols of American power struck without warning: both World Trade center towers and the Pentagon.  The actions of informed passengers on a fourth plane likely averted a strike on the White House or Congress.

An entire generation had horrifying visions of previously unimaginable events happening in their own nation, with memories firmly etched into their minds.

They say time heals all wounds. And for the families of those lost that day I hope there is some measure of truth in it. But there is a flip side: such events fade in the public consciousness, such that they no longer inform or shape how the nation acts. To quote the opening of the movie “The Fellowship of the Ring,”

“…some things that should not have been forgotten were lost. History became legend, legend became myth…” (click “continue reading” below to continue)

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Escaping the collective

Between them, Google, Apple, Facebook, Yahoo and Twitter carry enormous power to shape the public conversation.  What’s worse, all of those companies have shown themselves willing to censor and eliminate speech they dislike.  It’s time to find alternatives:

DuckDuckGo may never become a verb the way “Google” did, but at least their search engine doesn’t track your every move.  I moved to the Pale Moon browser after Mozilla threw out their highly successful CEO for having donated to the cause of not recognizing gay “marriage” in California. That same CEO has now created a new browser, Brave, which I use for most web work. You may also have noted over the past few months that some of my links go to Infogalactic, not Wikipedia anymore. And yes, Jemison Thorsby has a Gab account, though I use it to listen, not to broadcast. (Yet.)  I’m still looking into some of the email platforms noted in the video.  If I have recommendations later, I’ll pass them along.

Vox Day and his fellow travelers who have the chops to do so are trying to create content-neutral platforms as an alternative to the gulag-inclined monopolies that exist today. I don’t have the tech skills to help them, but I CAN contribute by using and promoting these alternate platforms.

And so can you. Silicon Valley needs to be overthrown as the biased gatekeepers of the national discussion.

A fake term

See if you can spot the fake term in this paragraph:

Infosys, the India-based information technology consulting firm with an office in Plano (Texas), is facing yet another reverse discrimination lawsuit asserting that it creates a hostile work environment for workers who are not from India or South Asia.

Let’s check the dictionary, shall we?  According to Miriam-Webster, the first use of the term “reverse discrimination” was in 1964 — right in the middle of the initial wave of efforts to subvert the United States by people who were convinced everything about it was wrong.

But why the compound term?  Simply saying that Infosys is accused of discrimination in hiring and promotion is sufficient.  The definition of “discrimination” is pretty clear:

…the act, practice, or an instance of discriminating categorically rather than individually

The term “reverse” is propaganda that suggests the victim of such action (usually white, male, Christian, or some combination of the three) is a reasonable target for such action since those groups discriminated in the past.  In fact, it seems to emphasize that “discrimination” in general is inherent only to those groups, since if it’s done by anyone else it’s just “reverse discrimination.”  Using the term subtly suggests to the reader/viewer that the instance is not as important as it would be if, say, the object of the discrimination was anyone else.  It’s a weaponization of language.

Discrimination is as old as the dispersion of mankind at Babel.  It is not an invention of Western Civilization.  People have a natural preferance to be with others who look, speak, think and live as they do.  So it makes sense that Infosys, an Indian company, would prefer Indians as employees.

This wouldn’t necessarily be a problem if the company only operated in India.  But it doesn’t.  Its operations in the United States, if the allegations are true, are just one more example of the posterity of the Founders being displaced by foreign invaders.  The tech industry is a vanguard of this process, with several high-profile instances of Americans being forced to train lower-paid foreign replacements, then laid off.  This abuse of H1-B visas by corporations, along with outsourcing jobs overseas, played a role in the buildup of resentment that led to Trump’s election.

It was a good thing that our society tried to become color-blind, and that opportunity was gradually expanded to people who had previously been left out.  Along the way, though, we started bean-counting by identity groups, which is a counterproductive way to eliminate group strife. Now it seems our elites now want to play the game of “payback’s a *****,” then act surprised when their targets fight back.  That’s why you hear the phrase “America first” more these days.  It should be expected, just as one would expect to hear “India first” if in New Delhi.

But New Delhi (and the headhunter organization Infosys) isn’t in the United States — is it?  Here, America — and Americans — have to come first.

Goofy: putting agenda ahead of revenue

About a week ago, I noted how Disney was using its new live-action version of “Beauty and the Beast” to add a “gay moment,” in the words of the director.  At the time, I pointed out that Disney has become so committed to this agenda that they will accept a ratings plunge just to add it to children’s shows.

And now it appears Disney would rather lose part of the lucrative overseas box office than remove the objectionable scene:

Walt Disney has shelved the release of its new movie “Beauty and the Beast” in mainly Muslim Malaysia, even though film censors said Tuesday it had been approved with a minor cut involving a “gay moment.”

The country’s two main cinema chains said the movie, due to begin screening Thursday, has been postponed indefinitely. No reason was given…

“We have approved it but there is a minor cut involving a gay moment. It is only one short scene but it is inappropriate because many children will be watching this movie,” Abdul Halim told The Associated Press.

He said there was no appeal from Disney about the decision to cut the gay scene.

There can be no doubt that the gay agenda has become more important to Disney than its own revenue.  All I can ask is, “where are the stockholders?”  It would seem time to shake up the leadership of the company, if one is going to invest there to try to make a profit.

One other note: many Hollywood productions travel the globe, where they essentially represent America to foreign audiences.  Shortly after 9/11, one pundit pointed out how Americans might be able to discern reality vs. fantasy in films like “Natural Born Killers,” but foreign audiences could conclude this represents actual American society. Given decisions like Disney’s latest, is there any question as to whether that is helping or harming our image around the world, in a war of ideas where image is critical?

Meanwhile, I hope anyone reading this will make the commitment my family has to avoid Disney or any of its properties.  No trips to Disneyworld (which is vastly overpriced anyway).   No movies in the theater, including Star Wars and Pixar, both of which are sure to be subverted to this agenda at some point.  If we think they’ve produced something worth watching, we’ll catch it on Netflix so they don’t get ticket receipts.  Our days of buying any Disney merchandise are over, too.

Companies like Disney and the tech industry can afford to be “social justice warriors” because they have good cash reserves to make up for temporary hits to the bottom line.

That can’t last forever.   (H/T: Vox Day)

 

Can you hear us now?

The elites of the Republican Party have been startled enough by Trump that they’re finally asking the right questions:

Something has gone terribly wrong with the Republican party, and it has nothing to do with the flaws of Donald Trump. Something like his tone and message would have to be invented if he did not exist. None of the other 16 primary candidates — the great majority of whom had far greater political expertise, more even temperaments, and more knowledge of issues than did Trump — shared Trump’s sense of outrage — or his ability to convey it — over what was wrong: The lives and concerns of the Republican establishment in the media and government no longer resembled those of half their supporters…

How, under a supposedly obstructive, conservative-controlled House and Senate, did we reach $20 trillion in debt, institutionalize sanctuary cities, and put ourselves on track to a Navy of World War I size? Compared with all that, “making Mexico pay” for the wall does not seem all that radical.

The most important question, however, is what is likely to happen as millions of Americans decide the Constitution is long dead and what we have in government is simply organized crime wearing the dead carcass of the America we grew up loving.  Hint: it isn’t going to be pretty.  Everyone is focused on Trump (the symptom) rather than the underlying causes (the near-complete corruption of our government to benefit insiders at the expense of everyone else.

Trump may be an outlet for the anger of many Americans, but his defeat will not end their disaffection. . . . Republics are first and foremost tests of faith. Hundreds of millions of people must believe in the system of government our forebears collectively agreed to; and they must believe the elections are free and fair and that the rule of law applies to all — the lowliest of the low and highest and mightiest. Otherwise, the Constitution is just so many very eloquent words written on really old pieces of paper.

Parsing the pontifications

Some thoughts and interpretations (in italics and parentheses) as I read through the transcript of Hillary’s acceptance speech:

“Now America is once again at a moment of reckoning. Powerful forces are threatening to pull us apart. Bonds of trust and respect are fraying.” (Pay no attention to how I’ve contributed to the fraying of trust by hiding my activities on a private server and deleting 30,000 emails after my highly questionable electronic practices came to light.)

“[Trump] wants us to fear the future and fear each other. Well, you know, a great Democratic President Franklin Delano Roosevelt came up with the perfect rebuke to Trump more than 80 years ago during a much more perilous time: The only thing we have to fear is fear itself!” (Of course, after saying that, FDR ordered the round up and interment of Japanese in America, due to the fear they could be an internal threat during a time of war. Kind of like the threat your refugee resettlement policy poses.)

“…remember, our Founders fought a Revolution and wrote a Constitution so America would never be a nation where one person had all the power.” (But my former boss, Barack, didn’t let that stop him from using his ‘pen and phone.’ I won’t, either.)

“I get it that some people just don’t know what to make of me.” (Maybe that’s because you often change your tune to match the prevailing winds, and always in support of your own ambitions. Despite all the smoke screens, though, some of us DO know what to make of you…)

“Tonight we’ve reached a milestone in our nation’s march toward a more perfect union. The first time that a major party has nominated a woman for president!” (And I’m counting on the “let’s make history” novelty vote to overcome that lack of trust I talked about earlier. Hey, it worked for Barack!)

“It’s wrong to take tax breaks with one hand and give out pink slips with the other.” (And that’s why I support oppose TPP (at least, some of the time) and will preserve H1-B. Oh, wait…)

“Bernie Sanders and I will work together to make college tuition free for the middle class and debt free for all. We will also liberate millions of people who already have student debt.” (By increasing government spending–and the national debt–even further. Barack only managed to double the national debt during his eight years. Wait until you see what I can do!)

“Donald Trump can’t even handle the rough and tumble of a presidential campaign. He loses his cool at the slightest provocation, when he’s gotten a tough question from a reporter…” (Something that, thankfully, my allies in the mainstream press help keep me from experiencing!)

“A man you can bait with a tweet is not a man we can trust with nuclear weapons!” (And a woman who passes the most sensitive national security information through an unauthorized, insecure personal e-mail server is not one we can trust with the launch codes, either.)

“I’m not here to repeal the Second Amendment. I’m not here to take away your guns.” (Please forget here that I once stated “we’re going to take things away from you for the common good,” or that to my party, “common sense gun control” includes three extra words to throw you off the scent… it’s really just about ‘control.’)

“And we will stand up against mean and divisive rhetoric wherever it comes from.” (Unless, of course, it’s coming from our camp.)

“More than a few times I’ve had to pick myself up and get back in the game.” (Usually because I was doing something questionable, got called on it, and had to play the coy “who, li’l me?” act in order to lull the gullible back to sleep. Like I’m doing now)

Don’t fall for it again, America!

Stay on Target…

You won’t see this on any mainstream news, but Target has lost 19% of its stock value in the 30 days since announcing its “choose your own bathroom” policy.  I’m sure any inadvertent official notice of this development will attempt to explain this away as a function of a weak economy.  That’s hard to do, though, when the official position is that the economy is doing just fine.

TGT quote - 18 May 2016 copy

Keep up the pressure!  “Stay on target” by staying out of Target!  Over a million people have committed to ensuring our self-appointed Federal and corporate social engineers hear that we’re fed up with their anti-scientific gender denial and efforts to force the rest of us to live in their fantasy world.  Have you?

Speak out while you can, or you may find your options increasingly limited.  These groups are playing for keeps.  So must we.