“No borders, no wall, no USA at all!”

That’s what Antifa hoodlums chanted in Washington D.C. last weekend while trying to pick fights with anyone who looked remotely to the political right of them. While they were mostly mindlessly chanting as directed, one could give them credit for succinctly expressing the formula they and their fellow travelers are using to kill the United States. Because without any borders, without any walls, there won’t be a U.S.A. at all. Or any other nation, for that matter.

And that’s the real goal of the globalists. Too many people think “globalists” is just a quasi-conspiratorial term, but it’s a very real phenomenon. A significant number of Western leaders act as if they owe more loyalty to their transnational peer group than they do to the people they supposedly serve at home. The same holds true of most transnational corporations, whose leaders are more concerned with international access and profits–even if it means bowing to autocrats–than they are with domestic considerations or notions of representative government. This has created a political and technocratic worldwide “ruling class” and, as writer Sarah Hoyt points out, a developing version of the same sort of neo-feudalism that existed under communism:

…communism was not discredited where it counted. There were no long-running exposes of exactly how bad it was in the Soviet Union, or the other communist countries, nor of the massive number of people – at least a hundred million, but quite likely more – that these regimes sent to their graves. There was no explanation about how imposing this kind of regime from above always leads to a quasi-feudal existence, in which the functionaries at the top are kings and everyone else serfs because it has to. Because the people at the top are still human, which means they not only have no idea what is “each’s need” or “each’s ability” but they have their very own greed and desire and other issues the same as any robber Baron. Only at least the robber Barons had to establish some industry, create some empire, finagle some monopoly. Those at the top of the planned economy have full power and cart blanch to JUST rob.

The development of this international club goes a long way explaining the horrified reaction to the election of Trump. The constant harping on his personal moral failings conceals the real anger: he doesn’t play “One World” with the other would-be aristocrats. From all appearances Trump is implementing the promised “America First” policies he campaigned on. Such nationalism—particularly from a key center of power like the U.S.—is intolerable to the globalists.

So they have unleashed their modern brownshirts – the Antifa (another Orwellian misnomer, since they are quite fascist in their attitudes and activities). These street brawlers, like their Nazi forebears, are an army of “useful idiots” to break down the fabric of representative governance so it can be replaced with something more to the totalitarian’s liking. Most of these black-hoodie footsoldiers have no idea they are helping destroy the very system that makes their self-absorbed grievance-mongering possible:

…Antifa, an assemblage of the psychotic and the helpless and mostly both, people who couldn’t catch a clue if the clue was on crutches, people who – from the exemplars caught and exposed – either exist in the sheltered bubble of Academia or in the equally sheltered bubble of their parents’ basements, people who, if they have any job it’s the equivalent of barista.  These people, who would have trouble existing in the relatively harsher environment of Europe… only survive because the US is so prosperous and so secure that – outside of a few Democrat fiefdoms like Chicago or East St. Louis — it’s almost impossible to get yourself killed for gross and offensive stupidity…

Perhaps Antifa activists should reflect on the fate of D.C. denizens Lauren Geoghegan and Jay Austin, whose belief that people everywhere enjoy the same basic goodness and resulting security led to their deaths on a bicycling trip through Tajikistan:

…Evil is a make-believe concept we’ve invented to deal with the complexities of fellow humans holding values and beliefs and perspectives different than our own [wrote Austin] By and large, humans are kind. Self-interested sometimes, myopic sometimes, but kind. Generous and wonderful and kind.”

This same misguided idea that “people are basically good” – which runs completely counter to the Christian worldview – is the foundation upon which the idea of communism (and globalism, its current incarnation) is built. It fails to take into account, as Hoyt pointed out, the inherent fallibility of our decisions, as well as the self-interested motives that often color them. This is one of many reasons globalists are opposed to authentic, evangelical Christianity. The Bible makes clear “there is none righteous; no, not one,” and the litany of accounts in its pages go on to prove even the most well-intentioned people will always be flawed.  As a result, the Founders understood that nobody should wield unchecked power over others.  Barack Obama’s famous “I have a pen and phone” statement of intent to use executive power to achieve what he could not through legislation ran completely contrary to American tradition.  And yet he had his supporters, his own cult of (manufactured) personality.

Perhaps, then, from a Christian perspective Antifa is best understood as a cult. They have a worldview, require professions of “faith” from their fellow travelers, and viciously ostracize any who challenge their viewpoints. Unlike other cults, however, this one is not just a danger to its own members. Left to themselves, they will bring our nation crashing down.  They seek to erode patriotism, faith in our Constitutional institutions, and any sense the U.S. is special.  Nations cannot survive without these.

The United States has never been perfect. But it has resulted in more opportunity, peace and prosperity for more people than any other nation in history. It has yielded to the temptations and sins of great-power politics, but nevertheless on balance has been a positive influence in the world. The system of human organization from which it springs is an infinitesimal rarity in all of history. As such, it is worth defending, lest this part of the world cease being the “last, best hope for mankind,” and revert back to what history shows is the default result of unfettered power over the masses.

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A beginning, perhaps

The unexpected election of Trump in 2016 gave voice to many in America who felt their country slipping away, beset by illegal invaders from without and traitors/enablers from within.  Since then, other countries are seeming to find their own voices:

New Italian government vows to create jobs, deport migrants

“The free ride is over,” League leader Matteo Salvini, Italy’s new interior minister, warned migrants at a rally in northern Italy. “It’s time to pack your bags.”

Austria’s government plans to shut down mosques, expel foreign-funded imams

‘Parallel societies, political Islam and radicalization have no place in our country,’ (Chancellor) Kurz told a news conference outlining the government’s decisions…

‘This is just the beginning,’ Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache added.

And in England, if the crowd in Trafalgar Square and marching through London yesterday is any indication, it seems the jailing of Tommy Robinson for continuing to cover the cancer of Muslim rape gangs across the United Kingdom has been the last straw for thousands.

2018-06-09Tommy Robinson protest

No wonder globalist meddler George Soros is whining that “everything that could go wrong, has gone wrong.” All of these developments have one thing in common: the “leadership” of nations refusing utterly to listen to their people. The countries of the world have been governed for some time by a class of people who have more in common with each other than with the countries they purport to represent. As a result, history and symbols of national pride are squelched or twisted, policies enforced despite popular resentment, and unwanted immigration floods the West. Such a disconnect can only go unexpressed for so long.

It is high time the peoples of Europe and the United States reclaim their authority over their governments. It will take much more than these small gestures for that to truly occur.  But perhaps we see the will still exists to make it happen.

Never forget September 11, 2001

Sixteen years.  That’s how long it’s been since the worst terrorist attack in American history.  A total of 2,996 people dead or never accounted for.  Symbols of American power struck without warning: both World Trade center towers and the Pentagon.  The actions of informed passengers on a fourth plane likely averted a strike on the White House or Congress.

An entire generation had horrifying visions of previously unimaginable events happening in their own nation, with memories firmly etched into their minds.

They say time heals all wounds. And for the families of those lost that day I hope there is some measure of truth in it. But there is a flip side: such events fade in the public consciousness, such that they no longer inform or shape how the nation acts. To quote the opening of the movie “The Fellowship of the Ring,”

“…some things that should not have been forgotten were lost. History became legend, legend became myth…” (click “continue reading” below to continue)

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Escaping the collective

Between them, Google, Apple, Facebook, Yahoo and Twitter carry enormous power to shape the public conversation.  What’s worse, all of those companies have shown themselves willing to censor and eliminate speech they dislike.  It’s time to find alternatives:

DuckDuckGo may never become a verb the way “Google” did, but at least their search engine doesn’t track your every move.  I moved to the Pale Moon browser after Mozilla threw out their highly successful CEO for having donated to the cause of not recognizing gay “marriage” in California. That same CEO has now created a new browser, Brave, which I use for most web work. You may also have noted over the past few months that some of my links go to Infogalactic, not Wikipedia anymore. And yes, Jemison Thorsby has a Gab account, though I use it to listen, not to broadcast. (Yet.)  I’m still looking into some of the email platforms noted in the video.  If I have recommendations later, I’ll pass them along.

Vox Day and his fellow travelers who have the chops to do so are trying to create content-neutral platforms as an alternative to the gulag-inclined monopolies that exist today. I don’t have the tech skills to help them, but I CAN contribute by using and promoting these alternate platforms.

And so can you. Silicon Valley needs to be overthrown as the biased gatekeepers of the national discussion.

A fake term

See if you can spot the fake term in this paragraph:

Infosys, the India-based information technology consulting firm with an office in Plano (Texas), is facing yet another reverse discrimination lawsuit asserting that it creates a hostile work environment for workers who are not from India or South Asia.

Let’s check the dictionary, shall we?  According to Miriam-Webster, the first use of the term “reverse discrimination” was in 1964 — right in the middle of the initial wave of efforts to subvert the United States by people who were convinced everything about it was wrong.

But why the compound term?  Simply saying that Infosys is accused of discrimination in hiring and promotion is sufficient.  The definition of “discrimination” is pretty clear:

…the act, practice, or an instance of discriminating categorically rather than individually

The term “reverse” is propaganda that suggests the victim of such action (usually white, male, Christian, or some combination of the three) is a reasonable target for such action since those groups discriminated in the past.  In fact, it seems to emphasize that “discrimination” in general is inherent only to those groups, since if it’s done by anyone else it’s just “reverse discrimination.”  Using the term subtly suggests to the reader/viewer that the instance is not as important as it would be if, say, the object of the discrimination was anyone else.  It’s a weaponization of language.

Discrimination is as old as the dispersion of mankind at Babel.  It is not an invention of Western Civilization.  People have a natural preferance to be with others who look, speak, think and live as they do.  So it makes sense that Infosys, an Indian company, would prefer Indians as employees.

This wouldn’t necessarily be a problem if the company only operated in India.  But it doesn’t.  Its operations in the United States, if the allegations are true, are just one more example of the posterity of the Founders being displaced by foreign invaders.  The tech industry is a vanguard of this process, with several high-profile instances of Americans being forced to train lower-paid foreign replacements, then laid off.  This abuse of H1-B visas by corporations, along with outsourcing jobs overseas, played a role in the buildup of resentment that led to Trump’s election.

It was a good thing that our society tried to become color-blind, and that opportunity was gradually expanded to people who had previously been left out.  Along the way, though, we started bean-counting by identity groups, which is a counterproductive way to eliminate group strife. Now it seems our elites now want to play the game of “payback’s a *****,” then act surprised when their targets fight back.  That’s why you hear the phrase “America first” more these days.  It should be expected, just as one would expect to hear “India first” if in New Delhi.

But New Delhi (and the headhunter organization Infosys) isn’t in the United States — is it?  Here, America — and Americans — have to come first.

Goofy: putting agenda ahead of revenue

About a week ago, I noted how Disney was using its new live-action version of “Beauty and the Beast” to add a “gay moment,” in the words of the director.  At the time, I pointed out that Disney has become so committed to this agenda that they will accept a ratings plunge just to add it to children’s shows.

And now it appears Disney would rather lose part of the lucrative overseas box office than remove the objectionable scene:

Walt Disney has shelved the release of its new movie “Beauty and the Beast” in mainly Muslim Malaysia, even though film censors said Tuesday it had been approved with a minor cut involving a “gay moment.”

The country’s two main cinema chains said the movie, due to begin screening Thursday, has been postponed indefinitely. No reason was given…

“We have approved it but there is a minor cut involving a gay moment. It is only one short scene but it is inappropriate because many children will be watching this movie,” Abdul Halim told The Associated Press.

He said there was no appeal from Disney about the decision to cut the gay scene.

There can be no doubt that the gay agenda has become more important to Disney than its own revenue.  All I can ask is, “where are the stockholders?”  It would seem time to shake up the leadership of the company, if one is going to invest there to try to make a profit.

One other note: many Hollywood productions travel the globe, where they essentially represent America to foreign audiences.  Shortly after 9/11, one pundit pointed out how Americans might be able to discern reality vs. fantasy in films like “Natural Born Killers,” but foreign audiences could conclude this represents actual American society. Given decisions like Disney’s latest, is there any question as to whether that is helping or harming our image around the world, in a war of ideas where image is critical?

Meanwhile, I hope anyone reading this will make the commitment my family has to avoid Disney or any of its properties.  No trips to Disneyworld (which is vastly overpriced anyway).   No movies in the theater, including Star Wars and Pixar, both of which are sure to be subverted to this agenda at some point.  If we think they’ve produced something worth watching, we’ll catch it on Netflix so they don’t get ticket receipts.  Our days of buying any Disney merchandise are over, too.

Companies like Disney and the tech industry can afford to be “social justice warriors” because they have good cash reserves to make up for temporary hits to the bottom line.

That can’t last forever.   (H/T: Vox Day)

 

Can you hear us now?

The elites of the Republican Party have been startled enough by Trump that they’re finally asking the right questions:

Something has gone terribly wrong with the Republican party, and it has nothing to do with the flaws of Donald Trump. Something like his tone and message would have to be invented if he did not exist. None of the other 16 primary candidates — the great majority of whom had far greater political expertise, more even temperaments, and more knowledge of issues than did Trump — shared Trump’s sense of outrage — or his ability to convey it — over what was wrong: The lives and concerns of the Republican establishment in the media and government no longer resembled those of half their supporters…

How, under a supposedly obstructive, conservative-controlled House and Senate, did we reach $20 trillion in debt, institutionalize sanctuary cities, and put ourselves on track to a Navy of World War I size? Compared with all that, “making Mexico pay” for the wall does not seem all that radical.

The most important question, however, is what is likely to happen as millions of Americans decide the Constitution is long dead and what we have in government is simply organized crime wearing the dead carcass of the America we grew up loving.  Hint: it isn’t going to be pretty.  Everyone is focused on Trump (the symptom) rather than the underlying causes (the near-complete corruption of our government to benefit insiders at the expense of everyone else.

Trump may be an outlet for the anger of many Americans, but his defeat will not end their disaffection. . . . Republics are first and foremost tests of faith. Hundreds of millions of people must believe in the system of government our forebears collectively agreed to; and they must believe the elections are free and fair and that the rule of law applies to all — the lowliest of the low and highest and mightiest. Otherwise, the Constitution is just so many very eloquent words written on really old pieces of paper.