Never forget September 11, 2001

Sixteen years.  That’s how long it’s been since the worst terrorist attack in American history.  A total of 2,996 people dead or never accounted for.  Symbols of American power struck without warning: both World Trade center towers and the Pentagon.  The actions of informed passengers on a fourth plane likely averted a strike on the White House or Congress.

An entire generation had horrifying visions of previously unimaginable events happening in their own nation, with memories firmly etched into their minds.

They say time heals all wounds. And for the families of those lost that day I hope there is some measure of truth in it. But there is a flip side: such events fade in the public consciousness, such that they no longer inform or shape how the nation acts. To quote the opening of the movie “The Fellowship of the Ring,”

“…some things that should not have been forgotten were lost. History became legend, legend became myth…” (click “continue reading” below to continue)

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On fakery, official and non

Apparently, traditional Americans are so evil that their enemies have to do some of the dirty work for them:

Mississippi authorities have made an arrest in the burning of an African-American church spray-painted with the words, “Vote Trump.”

Mississippi Department of Public Safety spokesman Warren Strain says Andrew McClinton of Leland, Mississippi, who is African-American, is charged with first-degree arson of a place of worship.

Meanwhile:

(Adam) Saleh’s video of the incident went viral Wednesday, along with his claim that he was kicked (off a Delta flight) “because I spoke Arabic to my mom on the phone.” Shortly afterwards, however, others pointed out that Saleh had a history of making videos about fake anti-Muslim racial profiling incidents and prank videos about planes in particular…

There sure seem to be a lot of these self-inflicted incidents.  One could conclude these people suffer from serious mental derangement in their efforts to paint certain other people as allegedly dangerous.  When you have to burn your own church or spray paint threatening messages on your own buildings, or inflict injuries on yourself in order to accuse others of misconduct, it’s time to reassess your view of the world.  That would require rational behavior, though.

Speaking of rational behavior, it seems it also is sorely lacking in some of the various Western governments’ security departments:

A string of security blunders left a failed Tunisian asylum seeker free to carry out the Berlin Christmas market massacre, it is feared.

German security services face difficult questions after it emerged that Amris, a lifelong criminal, should have been deported months ago

He had been arrested three times this year and his asylum application was rejected, but deportation papers were never served and he disappeared.

The Tunisian radical was known to be a supporter of Islamic State and to have received weapons training.

If you read the full article, you’ll find a tale of massive bureaucratic inertia that resulted in more deaths from jihad.  Hint to the German authorities: when people begin comparing your competence to the fakery and security theater that is the U.S. Transportation Security Agency or ‘border control,’ you’re not being complimented!

So our enemies pretend we’re more hateful than we actually are, and we keep pretending we’re doing something effective to meet their threat.   Sounds like everyone needs a reality check.  These are not the right times for security agencies to be acting like Keystone Cops.

Where to draw the line

Last week I had the unhappy chore of taking a flight (those familiar with my opinions of the TSA will understand the phrasing).  As I once again stood in the queue to have my privacy and dignity compromised in the name of ‘security’ by a government that refuses to secure its own borders, I had to marvel at the target they’ve created.  Were I intent on doing harm to many people (which, for the record, I am not), I no longer need to get inside the ‘secure area’ of a terminal.  I only need to become part of the crowd bottled up waiting to get inside.

That, of course, is what the bombers did in Belgium last week, while I was traveling.  As Mark Steyn points out, it seems the best our officials can do in response to bombers exploiting the system we’ve created is to further expand said system… which doesn’t eliminate the vulnerable bottleneck of travelers, it merely moves it elsewhere:

Security scanners could be installed at the entrances to airports, under proposals to be discussed next week in the wake of the Brussels terrorist attack, the Telegraph understands.

The case for installing a security perimeter outside of airport arrival halls will “definitely” be examined at an emergency meeting of experts that has been called for March 31, according to EU sources.

As Steyn says, if we’re going to keep moving the perimeter, why not move it to where it belongs: our national borders?  This would mean getting serious about preventing unauthorized crossings, as well as stopping the suicidal admission of hundreds of thousands of people–and their social trappings–from the very culture that incubates the international violence whose continued increase seems to have taught our leaders absolutely nothing (except that they can actively plot to replace their constituency with a foreign polyglot more to their liking and the people will let them get away with it).

The West continues to be subjected to the largest invasion of migrants in human history — a historic development that is destroying our civilization.  We are constantly lectured about the “strengths” in diversity, but where are these to be found?  In the sectarian strife we’re importing?  In the dilution of commitment to the values that once made the West the most successful civilization on the planet?  In the toleration of barbaric practices more suited to the 11th Century than the 21st?  The science fetishists seem to overlook the fact that sociology shows diversity weakens social bonds, it doesn’t strengthen them.  Rather than stop the invasion, we have been given security theater to condition us to relinquish the hard-won rights that have been the very hallmark of our civilization. And in the meantime, our leaders continue to import more of the peoples at the heart of violence around the world, despite the expressed concerns of their own nations (whom they arrogantly dismiss as ignorant, bigoted, or some other slight).

At what point do we say “enough?”  Not just at the ballot box, but in the streets and in person?  Our current president once recommended his followers “get in their faces and punch back twice as hard.”  The ongoing loss of our very patrimony would seem a just cause for putting that advice into action.  Sure, we’ll be called ugly names.  But remember – it’s a function of projection.  The real bigoted racists are the ones in power who have decided on their own that the Western peoples and way of life have no value worth protecting.  They have forfeited their legitimacy as leaders.

It’s well past time we find some others to take their place.  Otherwise, New York, Boston, Paris and Brussels were just warm up acts to the chaos that’s to come.

Where was TSA?

For over a dozen years, Americans have allowed themselves to be poked, prodded, embarrassed, X-rayed, and robbed by what is perhaps one of the most obnoxious agencies in the history of the United States: the Transportation Security Administration.  Not content with ‘manning the barricades’ at airports, TSA, like every organization, has followed the bureaucratic mandate of growth, deploying “VIPR” teams inside the country to harass those Americans willing to forego air travel to avoid the cretins.

Yet despite all this seemingly impressive security theater, TSA never has really solved the issue it was intended to address (…but what else is new with government, where actually fixing something puts you out of work!).  As I’ve said on this site before, the front line security is pointless (other than for conditioning a servile attitude in the public) when there are so many other points of entry not nearly so well attended.  The TSA treats the average paying passenger as the most likely threat…

…instead of 16-year-olds sneaking onto runways and climbing into wheel wells right before takeoff:

“It appears that this teenager scaled a section of our perimeter,” Mineta San Jose International Airport spokeswoman Rosemary Barnes told CNN. The boy “was able to proceed onto our ramp under cover of darkness and enter the wheel well of an aircraft.” …

Surveillance camera footage shows the boy hopping the fence at the San Jose airport, the FBI said. There’s also camera footage of him walking across the ramp in San Jose toward the Hawaiian aircraft, the airport said.

Video “is under review by federal and local law enforcement officials here,” Barnes said. “And we’ll continue to review that to determine where, in fact, the teenager was able to scale the fence line.”

That’s not the most important thing to determine.  Nor should the focus be on the fact the boy survived a trip that should have killed him, interesting as that is.

No, the most important thing to ask is that why, if there is footage of his entry to the aircraft, nobody in security noticed the action at the time or prevented the aircraft from taking off!  What if, instead of a 16-year old runaway, this had been a would-be suicide bomber?  We would now be asking what happened to a Hawaiian Airlines flight over the Pacific, and would be having a devil of a time trying to figure it out.

Isn’t this the exact type of scenario TSA is supposed to prevent?  What is the point of shaking down every wheelchair-bound grandmother at the public entrances to the airport, if your ‘secure areas’ are anything but?  Seems to me the resources are weighted toward the wrong threat vectors!

Some say the current administration is ‘the greatest fraud ever perpetrated on the American people.’  Personally, I think TSA gives it a good run for the title.  I seriously doubt there will be any accountability for this.  Whomever was supposed to be paying attention to the camera feeds that night will continue to draw a paycheck from Uncle Sam.  At most, they might be ‘reassigned’ to give the appearance of propriety, but that will be the extent of it.

And who knows, maybe it’s considered a good career move (and more fun) to be taken off camera feeds and placed at the gate, where you can exercise your au-thor-ah-TIE on the American sheeple.  It’s long past time those sheeple ask why, if the uber-presence of surveillance and ‘security’ can’t prevent a teenager from climbing onto a jumbo jet, just WHAT is it really there for?  Caution: the answers to that question may require confronting reality.

This ‘n’ That

– Financially underwater Uncle Sam is reportedly moving underwater vehicles into the Persian Gulf.

– Our southern neighbor is now the third-most dangerous country in the world for journalists, (…after Iraq and Afghanistan…) thanks to the escalating drug wars.  Good thing we have a secure border to keep all that mayhem from spilling over.  Oh, wait

– Recognition of government’s usurpation of the role of the family

– Things that make you go “huh?”  A ‘disenfranchised’ Texan who says she can’t find a way to obtain photo ID in order to vote somehow manages to board a plane to testify in D.C.   Wish they’d explained how *I* could avoid the TSA hassle next time…

– Para el español, ver la televisión…   demografía es el destino

Insanity: doing the same thing repeatedly and expecting a different result

– “The fact is, collectivists drive so hard to admonish respect for the past because every lie they tell us now has been told before a thousand times, to build a thousand gruesome empires…”  

Finally (…and most practically):
– A self-study reading list

The view from outside

A British newspaper takes a look at TSA’s growth industries:

Ever since 2010, when the Transportation Security Administration started requiring that travelers in American airports submit to sexually intrusive gropings based on the apparent anti-terrorism principle that “If we can’t feel your nipples, they must be a bomb”, the agency’s craven apologists have shouted down all constitutional or human rights objections with the mantra “If you don’t like it, don’t fly!” …

But now TSA is invading travel by other means, too. No surprise, really: as soon as she established groping in airports, Napolitano expressed her desire to expand TSA jurisdiction over all forms of mass transit. In the past year, TSA’s snakelike VIPR (Visual Intermodal Prevention and Response) teams have been slithering into more and more bus and train stations – and even running checkpoints on highways – never in response to actual threats, but apparently more in an attempt to live up to the inspirational motto displayed at the TSA’s air marshal training center since the agency’s inception: “Dominate. Intimidate. Control.” 

Yeah, it’s probably appropriate the new Dept. of Homeland Security headquarters will be in a renovated asylum for the insane.  Only instead of inmates running the asylum, it appears they’re already running the country

A G-man’s view of TSA

I did not see this when it first came out, but recently found it.  Interesting perspective:

TSA has never, (and I invite them to prove me wrong), foiled a terrorist plot or stopped an attack on an airliner. Ever. They crow about weapons found and insinuate that this means they stopped terrorism.  They claim that they can’t comment due to “national security” implications. In fact, if they had foiled a plot, criminal charges would have to be filed. Ever hear of terrorism charges being filed because of something found during a TSA screening? No, because it’s never happened. Trust me, if TSA had ever foiled a terrorist plot, they would buy full-page ads in every newspaper in the United States to prove their importance and increase their budget.

I have a unique position from which to make these statements. For 25 years, as many of readers know, I was an FBI Special Agent, and for many of those years, I was a counter-terrorism specialist…

I have dealt with TSA since its inception and FAA security prior to that. I have witnessed TSA operate since they became a separate organization in 2002 and seen their reaction to intelligence provided them. I have now watched them operate for a decade, and I have respect for their hard-working employees who are doing a thankless job. But I have come to the conclusion that TSA is one of the worst-run, ineffective and most unnecessarily intrusive agencies in the United States government…

Frankly, the professional experience I have had with TSA has frightened me. Once, when approaching screening for a flight on official FBI business, I showed my badge as I had done for decades in order to bypass screening. (You can be envious, but remember, I was one less person in line.) I was asked for my form which showed that I was armed. I was unarmed on this flight because my ultimate destination was a foreign country. I was told, “Then you have to be screened.” This logic startled me, so I asked, “If I tell you I have a high-powered weapon, you will let me bypass screening, but if I tell you I’m unarmed, then I have to be screened?” The answer? “Yes. Exactly.” Another time, I was bypassing screening (again on official FBI business) with my .40 caliber semi-automatic pistol, and a TSA officer noticed the clip of my pocket knife. “You can’t bring a knife on board,” he said. I looked at him incredulously and asked, “The semi-automatic pistol is okay, but you don’t trust me with a knife?” His response was equal parts predictable and frightening, “But knives are not allowed on the planes.”…

Read the whole thing here.