Yes, sometimes we fight — and hard

Kurt Schlichter notes the difference between piousness and passivity:   (H/T Vox Day)

Jesus was not some sort of whiny wimp who refused to confront the establishment and took comfort in his own righteousness while leaving others to do the heavy lifting. Jesus made people angry, because that’s what happens when you defy bad people. Being a Christian does not mean that you have to shrug and let the likes of Hillary Clinton be elected so she and her minions can fire up her anti-faith pogrom against those of us who dare worship God and not the elite she represents. Maybe you didn’t notice, but they do not accept the concept that we have any legitimate interests or rights. They hate us. And, if we are weak and stupid enough to allow them to take power, they will act on their bigotry and prejudices. Baking cakes is only the start.

Resistance is not merely an option. It is a duty. And resistance to evil – because the desire to suppress our faith is evil – is not somehow unchristian because it can be aesthetically displeasing. Fighting back is not always pretty. Jesus cleared the temple of moneychangers. He made a mess and got people angry. He didn’t sit on the sidelines and write ponderous articles lambasting the people tossing over the tables because “We’re better than that.”  …

We don’t care because we are done seeing our morality weaponized against us. The Piouscons keep confusing passivity with morality.

The entire piece is worth your time.  Trump has many faults, but it seems pretty clear he is a patriot and someone who desires the restoration of good governance.  Despite my initial misgivings about him, I’ll take that over Hillary’s faux-Methodist globalism and personal aggrandizement any day.  We are to pray for our leaders, however gifted or flawed they are.  Let’s remember that the same God who can use flawed people to achieve His purposes is more than capable of changing those flawed people as well.  It’s been a pleasant surprise to see how faithful Trump has been to his campaign promises.  How much more of a surprise would it be to find that in seeking to combat the evil in our land, he found the Christ who is best able to defeat it?

Pray hard, Christians!

Advertisements

Where have all the Christians gone?

This is a lengthy excerpt.  I recommend you read the entire piece here.

A generation ago pop star Bonnie Tyler famously asked: “Where have all the good men gone?”

Since then, the situation has only gotten worse, Bonnie.  As C.S. Lewis noted, men in the English-speaking world have largely been emasculated, and men in the Church are seldom an exception to this decades-long trend.

To stand strong for one’s faith in Jesus Christ and push back against a culture that, in the words of Isaiah 5:20, “call[s] evil good and good evil” is to be “divisive,” “unloving,” “bigoted,” and “intolerant.”

This is because evangelicals have confused Christ’s command to love others with being likable, as if that were an attribute of God. (It isn’t.)  As such, they endeavor to be, above all else, inoffensive and polite.  This doctrinal malpractice has given us a generation of men who are what Lewis called “men without chests.”  …

I urge you instead to be offended by the way our God’s name is blasphemed in our country every day; by the 54 million children murdered in the holocaust of abortion since 1973; by the sordid sexual agenda that is eroding the very fabric of Western civilization; by the fact that Christians are dying for their faith, largely at the hands of Muslims, at a rate of 100,000 per year; and, most of all, by the reality that these things are being ignored, trivialized, or celebrated.  These are things that offend me deeply, and I hope they offend you, too.  Righteous anger has a place within the Christian life.  Tap into it.  In the words of Ephesians 4:26, “Be angry and do not sin.”   …

Evangelical Christians comprise a hefty 26 percent of the U.S. population. I fully believe that if they were to find their voices, their courage, and were to dispense with candy-assed Christianity, that we would see a Great Awakening in America.

Agreed.  Christ himself on several occasions was contemptuous with the authorities of the day, and felt no need to be “nice” to the those who wore the trappings but denied the Truth.  The Church should worry less about getting along with the world, and more about challenging that world, whatever the cost.  We need Paul’s persistence, not Osteen’s opulence.

Answering the question

Many people, including me, are asking frequently this year how our electoral choices came to be so ridiculously horrid.  Where is the honorable candidate?  The one who has been consistently honest and not self-serving?  Why are there no leaders we can trust?

We have to admit we ourselves are at least partially to blame.  Humanity is a lousy judge of character, because the “the heart is deceitful above all things and desperately sick.  Who can understand it?”

Let’s face it, at least today of all days: when the Perfect Leader showed up, many centuries ago, this is what we did to Him:

Crucifixion-3-Crosses

We were offered the Bread of Life, and the crowd called for Barabbas instead.  It shouldn’t be a surprise to realize our choices have been ever-more problematic since then.  Just remember that Christ still wears the crown He won that day, and no matter who wins the Presidency, they will one day bow the knee to the One who is Faithful and True.