Today’s readings

Two related readings I highly recommend today.  The first one is a bit long (including helpful infographics), but is an excellent summary of all we know to date regarding the efforts by bureaucrats to protect Her Hillariness, and later, attempt to overturn a duly elected administration.  The second reading places this knowledge in the light of broader trends that show the rule of law is, at best, on life support in this country.

Spygate: The Inside Story Behind the Alleged Plot to Take Down Trump.”  Excerpts:

This article builds on dozens of congressional testimonies, court documents, and other research to provide an inside look at the actions of Obama administration officials in the scandal that’s become known as Spygate.

To understand this abuse of power, it helps to go back to July 2011, when DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz was appointed.  From the very start, Horowitz found his duties throttled by Attorney General Eric Holder, who placed limitations on the inspector general’s right to have unobstructed access to information…

It is against this backdrop of minimal oversight that Spygate took place.

Starting in October 2015 and continuing into early 2016, FBI Director James Comey made a series of high-profile reassignments that resulted in the complete turnover of the upper-echelon of the FBI team working on the Clinton email investigation… Comey is the only known senior FBI leadership official who remained involved throughout the entire Clinton email investigation. McCabe had the second-longest tenure…

In order for Clinton to be prosecuted, the DOJ required the FBI to establish evidence of intent—even though the gross negligence statute explicitly does not require this…

As the Clinton investigation wound down, interest from the intelligence community in the Trump campaign was ramping up. Sometime in 2015, it appears former CIA Director John Brennan established himself as the point man to push for an investigation into the Trump campaign…

During this time, Brennan appeared to have employed the use of reverse targeting, which refers to the targeting of a foreign individual with the intent of capturing data on a U.S. citizen…

Meanwhile, another less official effort began. Information paid for by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and the Clinton campaign targeting Trump made its way to the highest levels of the FBI and the State Department, with a sophisticated strategy relying on the personal connections of hired operatives…

Most definitely, read the entire piece.  Next, Kurt Schlichter places this labyrinthine conspiracy in a broader context of a two-tiered system of injustice:

The media hacks failed for two years-plus, nonstop and without equivocation, but are they ever going to be held to account? No, they’re just going to gather in a big circle and Pulitzer each other…

Imagine you committed a racial hate crime where you falsely accused people who didn’t look or think like you of a horrible atrocity… Now, what are the chances the DA is going to transform your 16 felony counts into a $10K fine and a couple days community servicing? Your chances of said outcome are poor. They are poor because your pals are neither Mrs. Obama or Willie Brown’s gal pal.

Now imagine that you studied really hard while the rich kids partied and smoked dope… Now imagine how you feel when Durwood Richguy IV gets admitted to Harvard when he can’t count past 10 with his Gucci loafers on and you get slotted on a waiting list for Gumbo State…

Imagine you handled classified information and you took it home and put it on your iPad. Do you think the FBI would be super-concerned with your feels about it and give you a pass, like Felonia Milhous von Pantsuit got from Jim Comey…?

Our elite is not elite. Instead, it’s a bunch of bums who somehow got a little money and took the reins of power and are now shaking-down our great nation for every penny they can wring out of it. We owe them nothing – not respect, not gratitude and certainly not obedience.

If you still wonder how we got Trump, just look around you. He’s a cry for help, a scream against the injustice we’re surrounded by. This injustice is poison to our country. (emphasis added) This injustice is what makes republics fall apart, when the worthless ruling class pushes its contempt in the people’s collective face so hard and for so long that the population finally screams “The hell with this!”

It can’t continue. It won’t continue.

I hope Schlichter’s correct, and that The Reckoning is about to happen.  A friend of mine used to say “nobody is completely useless; they can always serve as a bad example.”  The underhanded, scheming fifth columnists in government who facilitated the abuses included on the list above, can still serve their country well — if we make a proper example out of them.  Where we find evidence of wrongdoing, we need to be sure to respect judicial process and the presumption of innocence (something that should distinguish us from the modern Left).  But if found guilty, Lock Them Up!

College and Congressional qualifications

…have apparently become a topic of conversation in Georgia:

A leading Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in Georgia criticized a fellow primary opponent for having only a high school degree. David Perdue, a businessman and first-time candidate for office, was touting his experience and education to a group of voters in January when he made a reference to “a high school graduate in this race.”

That candidate is Karen Handel, the former secretary of state and gubernatorial candidate. Handel left an abusive home at age 17, according to her campaign, and finished high school. She never graduated from college.

“Look at the backgrounds. Look at the credentials. There’s a high school graduate in this race, okay? I’m sorry,” Perdue told a group of Republicans in Bibb County. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has the video

The Perdue campaign told the AJC in a statement that “David was simply making the case that he is the most qualified person in this race to help get our economy back on track so that we can start paying down the massive federal debt. His comment was based on facts that are a matter of public record.”

Here we see a glimpse of the arrogance of the would-be ruling elite.  Question: who do you think knows ‘real life’ for the average American best: someone who went straight to college and became a successful (and wealthy) businessman, or someone who clearly had enough character to overcome an abusive childhood and achieve at least the responsibility of Secretary of State for Georgia?  Which candidate will relate better to the challenges most of their constituents face?  Which is more likely to favor legislation the strengthens the hand of their fellow college-graduate-turned-successful-socialites?

Admittedly, I know little else about any of these candidates’ backgrounds (I’m not a Georgia voter, so have not followed this race until now).  But I truly hope this conversation becomes widespread, for two reasons:

– It’s long past time we re-examine what ‘representative government’ means.  I don’t think it means a legislative caste drawn almost exclusively from a pool of the wealthy and highly credentialed.  Do we want bright, intelligent, empathetic representatives?  Absolutely.  I’m not certain a college education necessarily implies or guarantees any of those traits anymore.

– Which comes to the second point: we need to have an honest conversation about the value of college today.

The Perdue campaign, in their response to this public kerfuffle, made reference to the need to pay down the national debt.  I have no idea whether Perdue used student loans to get his allegedly all-important degree, or whether he was fortunate enough to pay as he went.  Regardless, it seems Handel didn’t attempt college by taking on massive amounts of debt, as is the case for far too many people these days.

Who, then, is more likely to have the values of thrift and discretion that are essential to staunching the bleeding of ever-increasing debt?  Just a thought…

I firmly believe the college model as most people approach it today is outdated.  It has become yet another big business, bilking consumers for as much as the market will bear–and then some–while returning as little as possible in many cases.  In addition, what college provides these days is often less ‘education’ than it is ‘indoctrination’ — and that may in fact be part of the concern over Handel’s lack thereof (“oh, no!  She hasn’t spent four–or more–years studying Feminist Studies and The History of ethnic grievances!  We can’t have that in Congress!)

The well-ingrained social assumption that a college degree is essential to make a living today is simply not true, as a handful of individuals like Mike Rowe are quick to point out.  Hard work and character are still enough to make a way in this world, although the cards are often stacked against them.  An over-emphasis on credentialism undermines what a merit society is supposed to be.*

Higher education is hitting the outer limits of a bubble that has gone on for decades.  Without the availability of easy loans, there is no way tuition could have skyrocketed to the levels it has reached.  It’s well past time to ask what the return on this debt-driven experience really is, and whether it’s really an essential part of developing tomorrow’s workers, leaders and entrepreneurs.  We may just find that it’s become part of the machinery that keeps the ‘sheeple’ on desired tracks.

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* This is not just an academic discussion for our family.  The Oldest Musketeer is a high school graduate now.  He has been working an entry level job this year, while we examined his options.  He knows what he’d like to do, and it does require a certain amount of credentialing… but not necessarily a 4-year college degree.  He is but one example of many young men and women who would benefit from a more trade-school approach that focuses on what they find fulfilling, instead of the university model that saddles so many youngsters with mandatory classes they will never use…and the debt that pays for them.  As such, we’ve been careful to select a two-year Associate Degree program that focuses on the core skills and credentials he’s trying to obtain.  By doing so, we’re plotting out a five-semester track for which we already have money saved to cover slightly more than three of the five if he continues to live at home.  If the plan completes as envisioned, he’ll graduate with a degree in something he wants to do, with no debt hanging over his head (or Mom and Dad’s).  There were some who showed signs of curiosity when he didn’t immediately follow his peers off to school last Fall.  As homeschoolers, we’re used to the occasional eyebrow.  I can say that this year of work and self-discovery was a valuable investment in its own right, and I’ve enjoyed watching him grow.  My point is simply that there has never been–and never will be–a ‘one size fits all’ solution to getting the next generation on its feet and self-sustaining.  No child–or society–should be left on autopilot.  ((this postscript added with the approval of the Oldest Musketeer))