Utopia doesn’t exist

Israel Wayne takes staccato shots at some of the top utopian myths:

Here are the Top Ten Utopian Myths, in no particular order:

Myth 1. Life would be better if everyone had the same income and/or resources.
Truth: A totally classless society is impossible. All attempts at socialism (forced redistribution of wealth) have resulted eventually in overall collective poverty (and an insanely wealthy oligarchy who steals from the public).

Myth 2. If we could only communicate better, then we would understand each other, and we would all get along.
Truth: If we truly understood what everyone else really believed, we might like each other less!

Myth 3. We can legislate our way to a perfect and peaceful society.
Truth: All law is an imposition of an external standard on someone who doesn’t want to embrace it. The problem is not a lack of legislation, it is that many people desire to do things that are harmful to others, and they always will. In case we haven’t noticed, criminals do not obey the law…  (emphasis added)

Read the rest here.

Our utopian dreams are a reflection of our deep understanding we were meant for a better place than this fallen world.  We have the power to change our own individual behavior.  We don’t have the power, individually or collectively, to create a perfect society.  That hasn’t kept humanity from trying, often at great cost.  We need to live as much like Christ as possible in this life, and rely on His promise of a future where there is no more “mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore.”  Ironically, such “living forwardly” provides the best possible solution to our present circumstances, to the extent we embrace it:

“If you read history you will find that the Christians who did most for the present world were precisely those who thought most of the next. It is since Christians have largely ceased to think of the other world that they have become so ineffective in this.”                   — C.S. Lewis

Saturday Sounds – post-election edition

Roughly two weeks before the election, Donald Trump gave a speech at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in which his tendency to ramble gave way to a more coherent explanation of what his agenda looks like.

I seriously doubt any of the riotous protestors, who’ve again shown their infantile inability to discuss anything seriously or soberly, have actually dissected this address and examined its contents. That’s not the Left’s way. The Left runs on emotion and demagoguery, while the ‘silent majority’ in the nation simply wants the place run on what used to be known as common sense.

This has been a painfully difficult election season.  I will admit that the speech above became a turning point for my own assessment of it.  The real question is whether Trump can — or will be allowed to — adhere to this clearly outlined agenda, or whether he’ll be co-opted by the establishment, or lose focus and once again begin to ramble and tweet rather than govern.

Much depends on the next four years.  Secession isn’t just a subject for ‘neo-Confederates’ anymore.  The bonds that have tied our nation together are breaking audibly, and it will take inspired, selfless leadership, to begin binding up the nation’s divisions.

Will Trump be up to the challenge?  Only time will tell.  Regardless, let’s remember to look at substance and not stagecraft.

A no-brainer

This should be one of those proposals that enjoys broad bipartisan support among the citizenry:

Rep. Rod Blum (R-Iowa) introduced legislation on Tuesday to prevent members of Congress from ever becoming lobbyists after they leave office…

Kudos to the couple of Democrats who tried last year to introduce the same ban.  Wonder why ‘it never received legislative action?’ (that was sarcasm, by the way…)

Why is this needed?

Current law requires House members to wait at least a year after leaving office before becoming lobbyists. Former senators, meanwhile, must wait at least two years.

The Center for Responsive Politics found that more than half(!) of the former members of the 111th and 112th sessions of Congress who found new jobs had become either lobbying clients or joined lobbying firms.

Want to make Congress more responsive to the people?  Make sure it can only work for the people… not audition for lucrative post-congressional careers!  The revolving door between Washington, Wall Street and K-Street has to stop, if the average American is ever to have true representation again.

While we’re at it, how about we ban all campaign contributions from corporations?  If you can’t raise the money to campaign simply from the individual voters you would represent, then you obviously have no business pretending to represent them.

Time to shatter business as usual… light up the phone lines on Capitol Hill and tell them to make sure this proposal GETS legislative action — and passage — this time!